Eczema can range from mild patches of irritated skin, to more severe symptoms with red, cracked, bleeding and sore skin.

While for many people it can be a long-term condition, others may experience flare-ups with certain triggers making symptoms worse.

Common areas affected include behind the knees, the inside of the elbows, on the side of the neck and around the eyes and ears.

Eczema is very common affecting 1 in 5 children and for some people it can continue into adulthood. The condition is thought to be on the rise due to lifestyle and environmental factors.

The exact causes can be related to many things. Environmental factors can play a part, as can diet. It can often occur in people who suffer from other allergies such as asthma and hay fever and can also run in families.*

So, are there any natural remedies for eczema?

You should always speak to your GP or healthcare practitioner in the first instance for advice on the best way to care for your particular skin condition as there are many different courses of action to help with eczema. If your GP does diagnose eczema, they may recommend gently moisturising the affected areas.

However as with any type of sensitive skin, be cautious with the types of products you use.

In terms of natural remedies for eczema, some essential oils, when blended professionally by experts in readymade skin care products may be of benefit. A gentle formulation with Lavender Oil for example may help with soothing dry skin but for especially sensitive skin look for hypoallergenic creams which contains no fragrance, no essential oil and no colour.

It’s also worth giving some thought to what you use to wash your clothes as harsh detergents can also upset the skin.

There are natural non-bio products available which are designed to be effective even at low temperatures. The Faith in Nature super concentrated laundry liquid is gentle enough for woollens, fine fabrics and baby’s clothes and it is also mild enough for sensitive skin. It is also free from Enzymes, Parabens, Phosphates or Bleaches.

* Source - NHS